Aetna Assists at “Fire Ops 101 Day”

HARTFORD- On April 10th, 2017 The Uniformed Professional Fire Firefighters Association of Connecticut hosted an event at Hartford FD’s Training Academy. “Fire Ops 101 Day” provides elected officials and other civilians the opportunity to experience the physical and mental challenges that first responders face on a daily basis.

Representative from Aetna Ambulance, several local fire departments, and other agencies acted as handlers walking representatives through real life scenarios.

 

Please note below Aetna Ambulance Field Supervisors Bob Mara and Matt Campbell assisting participants with the care of a simulated trauma patient.

 

Cleared for Independent Dispatch: Aetna’s Alex Rosa Completes Precepting Phase

Alex Rosa BHARTFORD –  As of February 26, 2016, Aetna’s Alex Rosa has been cleared by Hartford Hospital medical control for independent dispatch as a paramedic to the towns that Aetna serves. His preceptor was Paramedic Supervisor Matt Campbell. 

Alex started at Aetna in November of 2015 and is a graduate of Capital Community College’s paramedic program and Quinnipiac University.

Alex says, “I love working in the prehospital emergency service profession because I feel as if it enables you to impact peoples’ lives in a variety of positive ways, whether you are actually taking part in “saving a life”, or just talking to someone who may be having a bad day or experiencing an unpleasant situation.” 

As with all precepting phases at Aetna, Alex’s final approval came from Hartford Hospital after shadowing him and his preceptor in the field as they responded to emergency calls.

On behalf of the Aetna Family, we would like to wish Alex the best of luck and say we are very proud to have such skilled professionals on staff.

Aetna’s Matt Campbell Promoted to Field Supervisor

Matt Campbell AHARTFORD — On December 4, 2015 Aetna’s Matt Campbell was promoted to the position of Field Supervisor.

According to Matt, “I have been with Aetna Ambulance since September 2011 and have enjoyed every day coming to work since.  I have been in EMS since 2007 and have not looked back. I started out my career in Boston at a private service. When I realized that I love this job and wanted to become a Paramedic, I enrolled in Paramedic classes at Comprehensive Medical Teaching Institute (CMTI).

“When I was in school I met my wife while she was attending college in Boston. We now have a family that is growing very fast. My wife and I have a two year old boy and are now expecting twin girls. I have been a Paramedic for over six years now. I became a preceptor for Aetna in early 2012. I am very exited to work with all my colleagues in my new position as Field Supervisor. Aetna is in a true fashion is a family; we stick side-by-side and work day-by-day together. I work with the highest level of professionals In the business every day.  I want to thank all of my Aetna family for all of your support. Let’s wish and hope for further success in our careers together.”

On behalf of the Aetna family we would like to congratulate Matt on his promotion and look forward to great things from him.

Aetna Ambulance Crew Assists Film Crew

HARTFORD — Aetna’s Matt Campbell and Justine Monahan assisted a film crew completing a sequence in Hartford in October of 2015. After speaking with the movie’s director and vetting the film’s concept and basic content Aetna Ambulance elected to help the director capture a few key scenes.

A large portion of the movie was filmed in Africa with the final portions filmed here in Hartford. The final title has not been worked out but the movie’s themes revolve around change, redemption and family as well as darker topics like escaping drugs and alcohol.

Cleared for Independent Dispatch: Aetna’s Eric Thepsiri Completes Precepting Phase

Eric Thepsiri Precepting Completion

Hartford Hospital’s Dave Bailey (L) with Eric Thepsiri.

HARTFORD –  As of August 21, 2015, Aetna’s Eric Thepsiri has been cleared by Hartford Hospital medical control for independent dispatch as a paramedic to the towns that Aetna serves.

Eric started at Aetna in March of 2015 and graduated from the Hartford Hospital-Goodwin College Paramedic Program. His preceptor was Paramedic Matt Campbell. The full precepting phase can take ten to 12 weeks or more as the paramedic is prepped for the realities of the field. Eric started in EMS at 16.  He is currently continuing his education at UConn with an eye towards medical school.

As with all precepting phases at Aetna, Eric’s final approval came from Hartford Hospital after shadowing him and his preceptor in the field as they responded to emergency calls.

On behalf of the Aetna Family, we would like to wish Eric the best of luck and say we are very proud to have such skilled professionals on staff.

The Story of Teddy the Trauma Bear

Teddy the Trauma Bear AHARTFORD — This bear started it’s cycle in Boston, MA thank so some EMS people from Boston EMS. It’s job is to circulate wherever via ambulance trips. Teddy would like to visit as many areas as possible. If you have received Teddy, it will bring you good luck…Teddy should be passed on to another crew at a hospital or wherever.

Please keep it going and lets enjoy the travels of Teddy the Trauma Bear!

Cleared for Independent Dispatch: Aetna’s Samuel Dybdahl Completes Precepting Phase

Samuel Dybdahl (L) with Hartford Hospital's Dave Bailey.

Samuel Dybdahl (L) with Hartford Hospital’s Dave Bailey.

HARTFORD –  As of March 18, 2015, Aetna’s Samuel Dybdahl has been cleared by Hartford Hospital medical control for independent dispatch as a paramedic to the towns that Aetna serves.

Sam’s preceptor was Paramedic Matt Campbell. The full precepting phase can take ten to 12 weeks or more as the paramedic is prepped for the realities of the field. As with all precepting phases at Aetna, Sam’s final approval came from Hartford Hospital after shadowing him and his preceptor in the field as they responded to emergency calls.

Sam has a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration, is a nationally registered Paramedic and received training as an Army Critical Care Flight Paramedic from University of Texas Health Science Center in San Antonio, TX. He  is a combat medic and healthcare specialist in the military since 2008 with one deployment to Afghanistan. Sam says he enjoys helping others and furthering his knowledge within the medical field. In his spare time he often competes in Duathlon/Triathlons, road races and weight lifting.

On behalf of the Aetna Family, we would like to wish Sam the best of luck and say we are very proud to have such skilled professionals on staff.

Cleared for Independent Dispatch: Aetna’s Jose Platero Completes Precepting Phase

(L to R): Aetna's Jose Platero, Hartford Hospital's Mike Zacchera

(L to R): Aetna’s Jose Platero, Hartford Hospital’s Mike Zacchera

HARTFORD –As of August 4, 2014, Aetna’s Jose Platero has been cleared by Hartford Hospital medical control for independent dispatch as a paramedic to the towns that Aetna serves.

Jose’s preceptor was Paramedic Matt Campbell. The full precepting phase can take ten to 12 weeks or more as the paramedic is prepped for the realities of the field. As with all precepting phases at Aetna, Jose’s final approval came from Hartford Hospital after shadowing Jose and his preceptor in the field as they responded to emergency calls.

Jose started at Aetna as an EMT-Basic in 2011 and graduated from the Bridgeport Hospital Paramedic Program. 

On behalf of the Aetna Family, we would like to wish Jose the best of luck and say we are very proud to have such skilled professionals on staff.

Praise Again for Aetna’s Matt Campbell and Kevin Mathiau

Campbell and Mathiau 2HARTFORD — On February 15, 2014 Aetna Ambulance crew members Matt Campbell and Kevin Mathiau responded to a motor vehicle accident in Wethersfield. Within two weeks the patient was randomly selected to receive a Patient Satisfaction Survey. The patient sent back a response on the care she and her family received.

Matt and Kevin received “Strongly Agree” in every response category. When asked to use a word or phrase to describe us, the patient wrote “Timely, professional, informative and caring.”

The following was handwritten in the additional feedback space provided:

“We truly appreciated the kindness that was shown to us and to our children by the EMTs and Paramedics. We were in a side rollover with our two small children and the EMTs and Paramedics helped make a very scary situation very positive. Keep up the excellent work. Everyone was very personable and we felt as if we were being cared for by good friends or family members.”

– Run #14-13714 (Information appears with permission).

Snow made for a tough day for emergency crews

HARTFORD, Conn. (WTNH)– This snow made for a tough day for emergency crews around our state to get to medical situations that could be life or death.

WTNHSome ambulance crews went out with help in the form of a snow plow leading the way. Read the original WTNH article and see the video here…

Kevin pushed the ambulance through 6 to 8 inches of slop on the roads as he heads to a call in Wethersfield. It has been a busy evening for this crew.

“We had a gentleman who had his fingers cut off in a log splitter today, thankfully we haven’t had any snow blower accidents yet today. We had a cardiac arrest this morning,” said Matt Campbell, Aetna Ambulance.

And now they are heading lights and sirens to a slip and fall patient in Wethersfield. The problem isn’t the snow, Kevin is used to driving in it and the plows are clearing the way… it’s the other drivers.

“A lot of people, they don’t want to get stuck in the snow, so they don’t want to move over for you, and a lot of people don’t need to be out,” said Kevin Mathiau, Aetna.

But they are out and they are clogging the roads so for big storms like this Aetna Ambulance brings on more crews and more equipment so they can spread it around and shorten response time.

“We will stage ambulances all over the city, we have 2 or 3 in every part of the city. The crews know already to slow down, take your time,” said Mark Hannegan, Director Aetna Ambulance

Telling an EMT or paramedic to slow down isn’t in their nature, but safety is and as long as they can get the patient into the ambulance quickly they can stabilize them for a long ride ahead. But with un-shoveled walks and un-plowed side streets crews sometimes have to carry the patient out to the main road rather than risk getting the ambulance stuck.

“We had to carry out a patient on a back board and there were 4 people on it, and it was a 200/300 yard carry, and it makes it difficult without any snow clearing,” said Mathiau.

“We pride ourselves on speed, and to get to the hospital efficiently and safely, and in this weather it is very difficult to get there safely so it takes a lot longer,” said