Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 12

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabHARTFORD — During April 2015, ASM Paramedic Supervisor Matt Tuttle and his EMT partner, Supervisor Mike Sparks, responded to a medical call in South Windsor. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Matt wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-24713).

Matt Tuttle

ASM’s Matt Tuttle.

“Nice job, Matt. Thanks for calling early.”

         – John Quinlavin, EMS Manager, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

Additionally the patient returned a Satisfaction Survey with every one of the 21 boxes checked Strongly Agree or Excellent. In a follow-up phone call he said that Matt should be commended, that he was “absolutely fantastic”, caring and took the time to explain everything as it was happening. Further, he said, “I have nothing but good things to say about your service.”

Vessel Angiography Findings/Treatment:  100% thrombotic occlusion of Distal RCA; hypotensive, required Dopamine, ejection fraction 55%.

Comments: onset 20 min PTA dispatched 0822; EKG transmitted on scene to ED & med control contacted prior to departure; left scene @ 0840 (South Windsor location)- in ED pt remained on EMS stretcher then to cath lab.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

EMS Agency: ASM 

Indication: STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side) Time:  08:28           elapse:  00:00

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                          08:32           elapse: 00:04

EMS STEMI Alert Request Time (source: cmed):      prior to dept.       elapse: 00:01

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time:                  08:36           elapse: 00:04

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                        09:01           elapse: 00:25

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                             09:17           elapse: 00:16

Procedure Start Time:                                         09:26           elapse: 00:09

First Device Time:                                                09:33           elapse: 00:07

————————————————————————————————————–

SFHED Door to First Device:                                                 32 min     

FMC to First Device:                                                              65 min

Hartford Firefighters, Paramedics Save Choking 2-Year-Old

Aetna's responding Paramedic was Samuel Dybdahl

Aetna’s responding Paramedic was Samuel Dybdahl

From NBC Connecticut. Read the whole story here…

[continued…] The fire department posted a letter from Aetna Ambulance on its Facebook page, thanking responding firefighters for their quick thinking.

According to the letter, EMTs and firefighters were called to the city’s South End around noon Thursday. They found the toddler unresponsive with a “complete airway obstruction.” Firefighters performed chest compressions and the Heimlich maneuver.

Medical personnel worked with firefighters to remove the food from the child’s airway and give the toddler oxygen.

Aetna Ambulance director of operations Mark Hannegan said the emergency responders’ teamwork kept the child alive.

Hartford Fire Department - Aetna Ambulance Service, Inc.“There is no doubt that without quick, calm and professional actions by all on scene, the child would have died,” Hannegan said in a letter to the fire chief thanking the firefighters of Engine 10. “The attending physician called and said that prehospital care ‘legitimately saved this kid’s life.’ He said that the child is doing well.”

Aetna’s Ashley Harkins and Justine Monahan Visit Wethersfield Brownies

Wethersfield BrowniesWETHERSFIELD — On April 16, 2015 Aetna’s Ashley Harkins and Justine Monahan visited Brownie Troop 10262 out of Wethersfield, CT. The two afforded the girls the opportunity to learn from strong female role models.

Scouting troop visits serve to increase children’s awareness of Emergency Medical Services, when to call 911, what Paramedics and EMTs do to help people and why serving the community is important.

National Donate Life Month: Jason’s Story

Jason age 12 (2)The following is a guest blog post that came to us as via our commitment to the intersection of EMS and Organ Donation, courtesy of LifeChoice Donor Services, and as part of National Donate Life Month.

The fear which truly speaks to the heart of a first responder and parent answering a child trauma call is, what if that were my son, daughter, niece, or nephew.  I’m here to tell you, having that fear realized is even worse than your worst anticipations. I was a police officer on the City of Groton PD for 25 years. I was on the Dive/Rescue team for 16 years, a Critical Incident Stress Debriefer, started the Dept. bicycle team, MRT, CPR Instructor, and received the Dept. Life Saving Medal. I have seen just about every type of crime, accident, injury, or wrong that can be perpetrated by one human being against another.  None of those skills prepares you to respond to your own son’s motor bike accident in front of your house on a cold early December Saturday while decorating for Christmas in 1997.

Memories of a screech of tires, a scream for “Dad”, doing CPR with my wife, a Nurse Practitioner, the distant sirens, and faces in the periphery. The aftermath of a miscalculation by Jason, my 15 year old, and another friend’s collision, would never be undone.  The hazy memory of an ambulance ride, hospital personnel, worried faces, and then finally a pronouncement the next day of an unrecoverable traumatic brain injury, despite the helmet, all reside within me still.

Through the haze, numbness, denial, phone calls, hugs, and raw soul-wracking tears, I remember being quietly asked about donation.  My wife, having been a critical care nurse at one time, found it easy to respond yes, while I was not yet ready to accept this finality.  But I also knew deep within my heart that if lives could be saved by such a simple choice when no other outcome was possible, then of course we’d do that.  And it might even make some sense out of a senseless loss, or at least be a life-affirming positive side to an otherwise helpless situation.  It also gave us some sense of control in the chaos around us.

The decision was made to donate any and all organs, bone, and skin tissue, and I distinctly remember thinking why do anything limited or ‘half-ass’, that if a life or lives could be saved by this simple act, even though my son’s could not, then that’s what we’d do, and I signed the papers.  (As a side note to all this, we were still able to have an open casket and say our final goodbyes to Jason.)   I won’t pretend it was easy, but it was right, and over time has made life without Jason easier knowing his life had meaning, and does, in a real sense, still go on.

By Jim Murray, Jason’s dad

Norwich, CT

LifeChoice is the federally designated, non-profit organ procurement organization (OPO) for six counties in Connecticut and three counties in Western Massachusetts, with a combined population of 2.3 million people. The OPO serves 23 acute care hospitals for organ and tissue donation, and has two organ transplant hospitals: Hartford Hospital in Hartford, CT, and Baystate Medical Center in Springfield, MA. For more information or to schedule an in-service, please contact Donna Crombez at dcrombez@lifechoiceopo.org.

Cleared for Independent Dispatch: Aetna’s Juan Rodriguez Completes Precepting Phase

Juan Rodriguez (L) with Hartford Hospital's Dave Bailey

Juan Rodriguez (L) with Hartford Hospital’s Dave Bailey

HARTFORD –  As of April 16, 2015, Aetna’s Juan “J” Rodriguez has been cleared by Hartford Hospital medical control for independent dispatch as a paramedic to the towns that Aetna serves.

J started at Aetna as an EMT-Basic in March of 2010 and graduated from the Hartford Hospital-Goodwin College Paramedic Program. His preceptor was Paramedic Kevin Stock. The full precepting phase can take ten to 12 weeks or more as the paramedic is prepped for the realities of the field.

As with all precepting phases at Aetna, J’s final approval came from Hartford Hospital after shadowing him and his preceptor in the field as they responded to emergency calls.

On behalf of the Aetna Family, we would like to wish J the best of luck and say we are very proud to have such skilled professionals on staff.

Words That Describe Us: Volume 53

Aetna Ambulance Service, Inc. - Ambulance Service of Manchester, LLC.MANCHESTER and HARTFORD — Aetna Ambulance and ASM send Patient and Customer Satisfaction Surveys to a random sampling of patients who have received emergency or STAT inter-facility services from our companies.

The final question in the survey asks “Do you have any suggestions on how we can improve our service?” And, “Please use one word to describe us.”

Some of the answers/responses included:

  • Skilled.
  • Very impressive. They were great. I don’t remember much.
  • Competent and comforting.
  • Very professional and thoughtful.
  • Great.
  • Helpful + reassuring.
  • Very professional and kind.
  • Excellent: Thank you!
  • Very professional, caring.
  • Very nice.
  • We were very happy with their service + appreciate their caring help. (15-13680; D. Pozniak, S. Yenco).
  • Caring, well organized & efficient (15-17246; G. Geres, S. Boutot).
  • Professional, caring, competent. Crews on [X] trip and [X] return home were wonderful to Dad and took great care of him. (B. Mathiau, D. Kapplan, P. Gleason, M. Hoyt).
  • The ambulance crew were very kind + took very good care of my wife. Thank you.
  • Professional, low key. (15-17217; A. Harkins, J. Monahan).
  • Attentive.
  • They are fantastic (15-17847; M. Buerk, P. Yakushchenko with Manchester Fire Rescue EMS).
  • Wonderful.
  • The team was caring, gentle and professional. Thank you for all you did for me. (15-17362; R. Davenport, C. Everest).
  • Great!
  • Professional, friendly, courteous. (15-18080; M. Tuttle, D. Tedeschi).
  • Professional/courteous.
  • Professional x 3.
  • Reassuring and efficient.
  • I am glad that I could choose the hospital I wanted to go to.
  • The ambulance attendance (sic) were very caring + supportive + comforting. Thank you.
  • Very comforting.
  • The two ladies that came were very nice and made my daughter feel comfortable and stress free. 1st experience ever with ambulance service. Have nothing bad to say. They came so fast…Very satisfied! (15-19133; G. Geres, S. Debarge).

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 11

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabHARTFORD — During March 2015, ASM Paramedic Adam Fine and his partner David Tedeschi responded to a medical call in Coventry with Coventry Volunteer Fire Association (CVFA) ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Adam wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-17116)

Adam Fine

ASM’s Adam Fine

“First Medical Contact to device under 90 minutes!!!”

         – John Quinlavin, EMS Manager, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

  • 100% left posterior descending artery ballooned.
  • Re-clotted, managed medically.

EMS Agency:                   ASM (Coventry)

Indication:                        STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side) Date/Time:           16:31          

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                                             16:34          elapse: 00:03

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time (source: Lifenet):       16:42           elapse: 00:08

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                                          17:06            elapse: 00:24

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                                               17:21           elapse: 00:15

Procedure Start Time:                                                           17:42           elapse: 00:21

First Device Time:                                                                  17:57          elapse: 00:15

————————————————————————————————————-

SFHED Door to First Device:                                                 51 min

FMC to First Device:                                                               86  min

 

Thank You Note for ‘Grace and Professionalism’

Ambulance Service of Manchester, LLC.April 6, 2015

Dear Ambulance Service of Manchester:

This is a Thank you note; the two young people you sent to take me from Johnson Memorial Hospital on January XX, 2015 were an absolute godsend. I’m just sorry I don;t know their names. They picked me up during a horrible snowstorm with the wind blowing and snow pelting down. Both of your employees were professional, considerate and had a combined sense of humor. I could have have asked for more in helping me get into my house after having had surgery 48 hours earlier. I am not the lightest patient in the world but they handled me with grace and professionalism….Please tell them [Patient Name] said Thank you and well done. They are a credit to your business which requires so many skills that cannot be taught; They have my appreciation.

Sincerely,

[Patient Name], Run Number 15-6828.

ASM Crew: Bill DelGaizo and Laura McHugh

Words That Describe Us: Volume 52

Aetna Ambulance Service, Inc. - Ambulance Service of Manchester, LLC.MANCHESTER and HARTFORD — Aetna Ambulance and ASM send Patient and Customer Satisfaction Surveys to a random sampling of patients who have received emergency or STAT inter-facility services from our companies.

The final question in the survey asks “Do you have any suggestions on how we can improve our service?” And, “Please use one word to describe us.”

Some of the answers/responses included:

  • Could not have been smoother. Thank you. Fast + competent service. (15-7495; S. Crittenden, N. Raiola).
  • Professional, courteous, made me feel safe and well care for. (15-12482; T. Salva, J. Basora)
  • Better than superb. I feel that your ambulance crew saved my life. I don’t have the words to thank you enough. Also, your dispatcher was extremely nice when my son called to get details. (15-19637; R. Bilodeau, J. Startup).
  • Professional and friendly.
  • Compassionate ambulance crew.
  • Great crew.
  • Professional, competent.
  • D + M were fabulous. M was the first [EMS Provider] that gave me a comfortable ride. I’ve had too many ambulance rides. (15-5103; D. Slomcinsky, M. Makulis).
  • Gave me and my husband peace of mind. Thank –u. God bless all of you. (15-12061; M. Hoyt, K. Baker, B. Krzynowek).
  • Great.
  • They kept me calm and at ease. [K. Russell] was very comforting. (15-8437; K. Russell, J. Bush).
  • Kind + caring + professional.
  • I didn’t ride with him but I know they were excellent here at our home and at the hospital. (15-13110; T. Oliver, S. Boutot).
  • EMT staff was great. Many thanks for their help. Please keep up the great work. (15-2044; J. Traber, C. Masslon).
  • Kind and very professional.
  • Very responsive to all questions ask[ed] by myself and they made me feel comfortable & safe. (15-15102; R. Balkun, A. Fine).
  • The crew was fantastic. Used a little humor when needed. Both EMTs were skilled and listened to my fears. I was so nauseated – the Paramedic took the time to start an IV + give me medicine prior to the ride to the hospital – so appreciated! Please let the Paramedics know how much I appreciated their care! (15-14073; R. Gonska, K. Mathiau).
  • Professional yet caring.
  • Very professional and caring.
  • “Doc” and partner were both professional and caring. They took my accident seriously and showed concern for me, which put me at ease. Thanks to both men!! (15-14439; M. Levasseur, J. Lentini).
  • Considerate and comforting.

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 10

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabHARTFORD — During March 2015, ASM Paramedic Ted Oliver and his partner David Rice responded to a medical call in Somers with Somers Fire Department ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Ted wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-21457)

“Another great job by our ASM partners and this time with Somers Fire. The bar has been raised now with measuring the time from first medical contact to device in the Cath Lab and this requires a strong team effort to meet the new benchmark. Rapid identification and notification are critical elements to success.”

         – John Quinlavin, EMS Manager, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

  • 100% occlusion of the posterior left anterior descending artery.
  • 90% occlusion of the ramus artery (a division of the left main coronary artery)
  • 100% occlusion of the first through third obtuse marginal arteries
  • 80% RCA ejection fraction < 20%. IABP placed. No PCI – CABG performed.

Treatment by EMS and Direct to SFH ED

EMS Agency: ASM  (run # 21457) (Somers FD Ambulance transported)

Indication: STEMI

 First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side)            15:05          elapse:  00:00

 EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                         15:10          elapse: 00:05

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time:                    15:22          elapse: 00:12

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                         15:56          elapse: 00:34

 Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                             16:14          elapse: 00:18

 Procedure Start Time:                                         16:17          elapse: 00:03

SFHED Door to First Device:          to start proc.                 21 min

FMC to First Device:                        to start proc                  72 min

Eleven Children Injured In School Bus Crash In Wethersfield

IMG_2330Hartford Courant

by Christine Dempsey and David Moran

WETHERSFIELD — About a dozen children have been sent to area hospitals after a school bus crash.

See the original Courant article here...

Police, firefighters and seven ambulances were dispatched to the scene, 52 Prospect Street, shortly before 8:50 a.m., according to an ambulance company spokesman.

The crash has been declared a “mass casualty incident,” with all students on the bus being transported to hospitals, said David Skoczulek of Aetna Ambulance Service, Inc.

As of 9:15 a.m., 11 patients have been transported to area hospitals. Seven were sent to the Connecticut Children’s Medical Center, he said, two went to Middlesex Hospital, one went to Hartford Hospital and one went to St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

The small bus appears to have collided with a Jeep Wrangler, which struck another car. The third vehicle then hit a fourth car.

The school bus reportedly collided with two cars, Skoczulek said. The extent of injuries is unknown.

The term “mass casualty incident” means that more resources are needed because of the number of patients. It doesn’t speak to the extent of injuries, Skoczulek said.

Read the full story here…

Courant Staff Writer David Moran contributed to this story.