Stryker Power Pro Stretchers Arrive!

MANCHESTER- On March 7th, 2017, The Ambulance Service of Manchester and Aetna Ambulance received 50 Stryker Power Pro XT Model 6506 Stretchers to be placed into service in the near future.

 

 “This industry- leading ambulance cot utilizes an innovative battery-powered hydraulic system to raise and lower the cot at the touch of a button.”

 

In addition to the numerous advances that come stock with these units, ASM and Aetna will be adding steering-locks as an after-market upgrade that will increase ease of use and maneuverability. The implementation of these new stretchers will help ensure the comfort and safety for both crews and patients alike. Installation for the ASM vehicles should be completed by the end of next week. Aetna should expect to see them in service in early April.

Mercedes Ambulances Arrive for Duty at Aetna and ASM

 

MANCHESTER — RecentlyAetna and ASM took delivery of seven Mercedes Sprinter Ambulances from American Emergency Vehicles (AEV). In an effort to keep up with the latest advancements in patient and provider safety, each new ambulance has arrived equipped with Stryker Performance-Load Cot Fastener Systems. In addition to securing the stretcher during transport, these devices offer guided loading and unloading, to increase both efficiency and safety.

 

New Aetna and ASM websites now live

Aetna Ambulance website ASM websiteMANCHESTER — Updated versions of the Aetna and ASM websites are now live and can be viewed by clicking on the logo of each company at http://www.asm-aetna.com/.

Available on the sites are forms, information on services, ride along and field internship, access to the company blog, contact information and more.

The sites were built by Image Works web design in Vernon, CT.

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 17

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabROCKY HILL — During early February 2016, Aetna Paramedic Ryan Gonska and his partner Logan Royale responded to a medical call in Rocky Hill. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Ryan wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#16-8644).

Rapid identification, treatment, and early notification (STEMI ALERT) is vital in the care of patients with cardiac emergencies such as ST Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction.  We hope the attached information is useful in the design and monitoring of your treatment strategies.     — Saint Francis Hospital staff

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

Treatment by EMS and Direct to SFH ED

EMS Agency: Aetna Ambulance

Indication: STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side)                             16:13    elapse: 00:00

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                                           16:17          elapse: 00:04

EMS STEMI Alert Request Time (source: cmed):                16:37          elapse: 00:20

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time (source: Lifenet):        16:19          elapse: 00:02

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                                          16:51          elapse: 00:14

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                                              17:13          elapse: 00:22

Procedure Start Time:                                                        17:28          elapse: 00:15

Vessel Angiography Findings / Treatment: 3V Dz; Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Consult.

Comments: Patient went MD office due to prolonged chest pain and shortness of breath; APRN performed EKG and administered Aspirin; No first medical contact time, so EMS times utilized- EMS dispatched 16:05 on scene 16:10. Transport 16:31. EMS performed 12-lead; STEMI Center activation at 16:37. Cath lab notified prior to arrival of patient. Patient required emergent coronary artery bypass graft instead of stents.

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 16

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabSTAFFORD SPRINGS — During January 2016, ASM Paramedic David White and his partner Ray Philbrick responded to a medical call in Stafford with Stafford Ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Dave wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#16-0017.

“Here is the full feedback report. Great job!!” – John Quinlavin, Manager, Emergency Medical Service, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form Treatment by EMS and Direct to SFH ED

EMS Agency: Ambulance Service of Manchester & Stafford Ambulance

Indication: STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side) Date/Time: 1/1/2016 01:00          elapse:  00:00

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                                           01:02          elapse: 00:02

EMS STEMI Alert Request Time (source: cmed):                01:19          elapse: 00:17

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time (source: Lifenet):          01:19          elapse: 00:17

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                                         01:41          elapse: 00:22

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                                              02:03          elapse: 00:22

Procedure Start Time:                                                          02:20          elapse: 00:17

First Device Time:                                                                02:46          elapse: 00:26

————————————————————————————————————–

SFHED Door to First Device:                                                65 min

FMC to First Device:                                                              106 min

Vessel Angiography Findings / Treatment: 100% SVG-RCA lesion open not stented.

Comments: Onset chest pain 00:00. Once patient on EMS stretcher Asystole, went to start CPR, patient responsive prior to any compressions.  This occurred again during transport.  STEMI team paged prior to arrival at 0122.

INTERACT Training for Emergency Medical Services – The ‘Red Envelope’

QIO-and-Qualidigm-logosINTERACT stands for Interventions to Reduce Acute Care Transfers. It is a quality improvement program designed to improve the early identification, assessment, documentation, and communication about changes in the status of residents in skilled nursing facilities.

The goal of INTERACT is to improve care and reduce the frequency of potentially avoidable transfers to the acute hospital. Such transfers can result in numerous complications of hospitalization, and billions of dollars in unnecessary health care expenditures. It includes clinical and educational tools and strategies for use in every day practice in long-term care facilities.

Here is the link to the INTERACT Training for Emergency Services:

http://www.healthcarefornewengland.org/providers/nursing-home/#tool

Then select “INTERACT Training for Emergency Services”

The training is about 12 minutes in length and covers the new acute care transfer process between a participating nursing home and hospital.

  • Not all nursing homes are part of this initiative so EMS will find that some homes will still be using the W-10 and other documents during their acute care transfers
  • The nursing homes that are using the red envelope as part of their new acute care transfer process will seal the red envelope and have a set of transfer documents for the EMS service so they will not have to open the envelope
  • The rollout date to begin using the new acute care transfer process and the red envelope is August 31, 2015.
  • The entire red envelope should be handed to the ED staff either at triage or in the ED room as the patient is being transferred from the stretcher to the bed
  • The red envelope is to be used only for acute care transfers between participating nursing homes and hospital – they should not be used for other types of transfers
  • There will not be a W-10 as part of the transfer documents – the front page of the INTERACT transfer form along with the residents’ face sheet meet the Department of Health Public Health Code requirements

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 15

EMS team receives Kudos from the Cath LabGLASTONBURY — During July 2015, ASM Paramedic Joshua Traber and his partner Supervisor Michael Sparks responded to a medical call in Glastonbury with Glastonbury Ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Josh wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-53809).

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form Treatment by EMS and Direct to SFH ED

EMS Agency: Ambulance Service of Manchester & Glastonbury Vol Ambulance

Indication: STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side)                           14:09          elapse:  00:00

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                                           14:17          elapse: 00:08

EMS STEMI Alert Request Time (source: cmed):                14:38        elapse: 00:21

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time (source: Lifenet):        14:37          elapse: 00:20

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                                            14:46          elapse: 00:09

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                                              15:37          elapse: 00:51

Procedure Start Time:                                                             15:46          elapse: 00:09

First Device Time:                                                                  16:07          elapse: 00:21

————————————————————————————————————–

SFHED Door to First Device:                                                81 min

FMC to First Device:                                                              118 min

Vessel Angiography Findings / Treatment:100% LAD and 80% RCA lesions; LAD open and stented. IABP required. NOTE: delay to PCI due to CTSCAN  to r/o aortic aneurysm-family history.

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 14

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabSTAFFORD — During June 2015, ASM Paramedics Jonathan Lentini, and Greg Derosier responded to a medical call in Stafford with Stafford Ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Jon wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Hartford Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-46694). The following are comments provided by Hartford Hospital’s Dr. Marcin Dada with some acronyms and patient information removed:

Today’s STEMI: Stafford to Hartford Hospital TOTAL Ischemia time 73 min !!!

Congratulations everyone!!!

This patient was brought from Stafford to HH by ASM and Stafford Ambulance (pre hospital ECG was sent and communicated to the ED attending: Drs. Dufel/Price and Cath Lab was activated).

Highlight:   We utilized the quick registration where the EMS team was met at the triage and the patient was brought straight to the Cath Lab.

In a nut shell:

STEMI Stafford to HH 2 STEMI Stafford to HH1) HH D2B Time = 30 min

2) Total Ischemia Time =  73 min  (goal <90 min [1st Medical Contact in the field to Open Artery Time in the Cath Lab]

3) 100% mid-RCA –> 2 DES (TIMI III Flow)

In particular, we would like to recognize the following teams:

1) HH Cath Team – Dr Hirst; D. Jordan, T Schrimer

2) HH ER Team – Drs Dufel, Price and Tilden, and the rest of the clinical team (I am sure we missed many as this was a quick triage)

3) EMS team : G. Derosier and J. Lentini and the Stafford crew.

Strong Work.

Regards,

Marcin Dada, MD

Co-Director, CPC

Manager, Structural Heart Program

Manager, Cardiovascular Data Management Center

Manager, Preventive Cardiology and Cardiac Rehab

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 11

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabHARTFORD — During March 2015, ASM Paramedic Adam Fine and his partner David Tedeschi responded to a medical call in Coventry with Coventry Volunteer Fire Association (CVFA) ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Adam wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-17116)

Adam Fine

ASM’s Adam Fine

“First Medical Contact to device under 90 minutes!!!”

         – John Quinlavin, EMS Manager, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

  • 100% left posterior descending artery ballooned.
  • Re-clotted, managed medically.

EMS Agency:                   ASM (Coventry)

Indication:                        STEMI

First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side) Date/Time:           16:31          

EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                                             16:34          elapse: 00:03

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time (source: Lifenet):       16:42           elapse: 00:08

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                                          17:06            elapse: 00:24

Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                                               17:21           elapse: 00:15

Procedure Start Time:                                                           17:42           elapse: 00:21

First Device Time:                                                                  17:57          elapse: 00:15

————————————————————————————————————-

SFHED Door to First Device:                                                 51 min

FMC to First Device:                                                               86  min

 

Kudos from the Cath Lab: Volume 10

Aetna Paramedic receives Kudos from the Cath LabHARTFORD — During March 2015, ASM Paramedic Ted Oliver and his partner David Rice responded to a medical call in Somers with Somers Fire Department ambulance. The EKG was indicative of a STEMI and Ted wirelessly transmitted the 12-lead EKG to Saint Francis Hospital, activating their cardiac catherization lab from the field. (#15-21457)

“Another great job by our ASM partners and this time with Somers Fire. The bar has been raised now with measuring the time from first medical contact to device in the Cath Lab and this requires a strong team effort to meet the new benchmark. Rapid identification and notification are critical elements to success.”

         – John Quinlavin, EMS Manager, Saint Francis Hospital and Medical Center.

SFH Cath Lab Patient Follow-Up Form

  • 100% occlusion of the posterior left anterior descending artery.
  • 90% occlusion of the ramus artery (a division of the left main coronary artery)
  • 100% occlusion of the first through third obtuse marginal arteries
  • 80% RCA ejection fraction < 20%. IABP placed. No PCI – CABG performed.

Treatment by EMS and Direct to SFH ED

EMS Agency: ASM  (run # 21457) (Somers FD Ambulance transported)

Indication: STEMI

 First Medical Contact (FMC) (at pt side)            15:05          elapse:  00:00

 EMS 12 Lead Acquisition Time:                         15:10          elapse: 00:05

EMS 12 Lead Transmit Rec’d Time:                    15:22          elapse: 00:12

Arrival Time (SFHED):                                         15:56          elapse: 00:34

 Cath Lab Arrival Time (SFH):                             16:14          elapse: 00:18

 Procedure Start Time:                                         16:17          elapse: 00:03

SFHED Door to First Device:          to start proc.                 21 min

FMC to First Device:                        to start proc                  72 min

2014 Mercedes Sprinter Ambulance Arrives at Aetna and ASM

2014 Mercedes Sprinter Ambulance AMANCHESTER — On September 26, 2014 the first 2014 Mercedes Sprinter Ambulance arrived at Aetna’s fleet maintenance area at ASM from American Emergency Vehicles in North Carolina.

According to Car and Driver magazine, “The Sprinter’s most visible change is its front-end styling, which adopts Mercedes’ smaller, Renault-based, Euro-only Citan van’s flashier look. The grille is more upright than before, and gets Benz’s latest take on its signature three-slat design. A new pair of headlights flanks the grille, and features the same eyebrow-like (LED!) turn indicators that have proliferated throughout the Mercedes lineup. A fresh hood accommodates the new fascia and headlights, and it sits higher than before. Inside, there are new seat covers and upholstery, the steering wheel is thicker, and higher-spec models even get chrome air vent surrounds.”

The most distinctive change thus far for the 2014 ambulance model is the new style light bar.

As of April 2014, all Ford ambulances (except for the bariatric units) had been rotated out of service and replaced with Mercedes (or Dodge-marked Mercedes) Sprinter ambulances. The unmarked 2014 ambulance will soon be sent out to receive the high-visibility Battenburg markings, rear chevrons and company logos. Operating fuel-efficient, safe and modern Sprinter ambulances is part of Aetna and ASM’s continued commitment to the communities we serve.

Three Sprinter Ambulances Arrive to Replace Last Fords

DSC_1741MANCHESTER — On April 28, 2014 three more blank Mercedes-Benz Sprinter Ambulances arrived at Aetna’s fleet maintenance area at ASM from American Emergency Vehicles in North Carolina.

The change will mean that both Aenta Ambulance and the Ambulance Service of Manchester (ASM) will be fully switched to Dodge and Mercedes Sprinters within the Type II category. This will leave only three Type III Fords for use as specialty bariatric units and none within the day-to-day fleet, a change several years in the making.

The three additional, unmarked ambulances will soon be sent out to receive the high-visibility Battenburg markings, rear chevrons and company logos. Operating fuel-efficient, safe and modern Sprinter ambulances is part of Aetna and ASM’s continued commitment to the communities we serve. 

Aetna and ASM Upgrade Transport Ventilators

Oxylog 3000 004HARTFORD and MANCHESTER — By the end of April 2014 Aetna Ambulance and the Ambulance Service of Manchester (ASM) will upgrade to a industry leading medical device known as the Draeger Oxylog 3000 Ventilator; “the ventilator of choice for emergency and transport ventilation.” Better to have one, according  to a Draeger tag line.

Aetna and ASM are entrusted with the safe transport of long-term ventilator dependent patients from premier rehabilitation long-term acute and chronic care hospitals such as the Hospital for Special Care. ASM also provides medically appropriate Specialty Care Transport services to the areas regional hospitals, transporting ill and injured patients to tertiary care centers in Connecticut and Massachusetts. The Oxylog is capable of replicating complex, in-hospital ventilator settings such as IE ratios, CPAP, assist control, SIMV and more.

The use of Draeger Ventilators is part of Aetna and ASM’s long-term commitment to providing cutting edge emergency medical care and our vision of putting gold standard clinical resources and equipment at the fingertips of our skilled EMS providers.

ASM Adds Second Type III Bariatric Ambulance

Ambulance Service of Manchester Bariatric Ambulance Stryker Power LoadMANCHESTER — On March 21, 2014 the Ambulance Service of Manchester put in service a second Type III ambulance for the transport of morbidly obese patients as well as for use with certain flight, specialty and critical care transport teams. The ambulance is identically equipped to ASM and Aetna’s existing bariatric ambulances, complete with a Stryker Power-LOAD stretcher lift system.

Capable of lifting a maximum patient weight of 700 pounds, it is the company’s belief that the Stryker Power-LOAD is the safest overall bariatric ambulance equipment. Read more about what makes the Power-LOAD system the safest...

STRYKER Power Load Stretcher - Aetna ASM AmbulanceAdding an additional bariatric ambulance is part of ASM and Aetna’s continued commitment to the communities and clients the companies serve. 

Aetna and ASM Invest in New Defibrillators

medtroniclifepak1000-2MANCHESTER and HARTFORD — Aetna Ambulance and the Ambulance Service of Manchester have purchased new LifePak 1000 Automated External Defibrillators (AEDs) for use on every Basic Life Support unit in both fleets. As one of (reportedly the first) commercial ambulance service in Connecticut to equip every BLS unit with this life saving piece of equipment, it was critical to continue the capability with new technology.

Each Paramedic Unit at Aetna and ASM use LifePak 15s capable of wireless transmission of 12-lead EKGs, external pacemaking, cardioversion, CO detection, non-invasive blood pressures and end tidal CO2 monitoring (specification arrangement also known as fully configured). DSC_1580LifePak 15s are used on a daily basis whereas AEDs see use on a rare occasion but have a significant impact for those patients. Typically the CPR and defribillation performed when these AEDs are used is the first skilled services provided to a patient in a life threatening situation.